Chris Rogers joined ASK in 2006, having worked as a consultant for 3 years on a wide range of projects for public and private sector clients. These included performance management training for a Formula 1 engine manufacturer, leadership development for a logistics and distribution equipment business, and up-skilling and shifting managers’ attitudes as a result of the merger of 72 organisations into a single public body.His career began in a variety of training and Organisation Development roles in corporate banking, focusing on developing the strategic HR approach to the changes affecting the industry, and on identifying potential for adding value.

He later joined the newly set up Learning & Skills Council, where he was responsible for learning and development strategy, e-learning, leadership development, corporate capability, competency frameworks and performance management.

Download Chris’s Executive Coaching Profile (PDF) 
View Chris’ profile (ASK website)

Questions and Answers

What’s the most valuable lesson you have learned, and who do you have to thank for it?
I am better than I give myself credit for and that I should have the self confidence to give it a go. Learnt with the help of a very wise man – my own executive coach!

If you could talk to your younger self, what advice would you give them?
You make your own way in the world so don’t wait for others to do it for you.

What is the single thing you still most need to learn?
Patience.

What is the most surprising thing you’ve ever discovered about yourself?
The competitive streak I thought that I had grown out of my 20s is still alive and kicking! I want others to succeed but I still want to be the best!

What one thing do you think every organisation would most benefit from doing, or doing differently?
Get out of the weeds and focus on the important things! Spend much more time identifying the priorities that are going to make you successful and then communicate them to everybody in the organisation to focus them on making it happen.

What is your worst habit?
Prevarication.